Is there a Future for Democracy in America?

February 4, 2020

I’ve been writing about gerrymandering and election law since I was in law school, long enough to feel very discouraged. When Anthony Kennedy didn’t take advantage of his last crack at gerrymandering while still on the U.S. Supreme Court, after having teased us for years about his willingness to deal with it, I was sad to the core of my being. Ezra Klein’s “Polarization and the Parties” which came out a week ago in the Sunday Times galvanized my thinking, if not my hopes.

Klein made it clear that the combination of gerrymandering, the allocation of Senate seats and the electoral college would soon leave 70% of America represented by 30% of senators and vice versa, and the electoral college will continue to “elect” presidents who have lost the popular vote. With the Supreme Court continuing to be shaped by those disproportionate advantages in the Senate and the executive, Republicans will continue to be able to stave off a more equitable representation in the House of Representatives. In other words, democracy will be a memory replaced by institutionalized minority rule.

Can we do anything about it? Klein points out that with their power resting firmly on these legal impediments, the Republicans will continue to fight fiercely against anything resembling democracy. Flipping control of the White House and Congress would certainly make a difference but would not change the electoral college, the Senate’s skew toward the least populous states or its grip on Supreme Court appointments.

There’s much talk about amending the Constitution, but that requires three-fourths of the states with the same unrepresentative dynamics to approve. So fat chance fixing the Constitution, whether by amendment or a convention as spelled out in Article V of the Constitution.

Then what? Our Constitution was adopted “illegally” by the terms of the Articles of Confederation. Could we do the same, create a new Constitution and specify, as the Founders did, how it should be ratified. That’s been tried on the state level but met an unreceptive Supreme Court. Could we expect better from this Court? And who’d count the votes? The existing and affected states or some nonpartisan entity? By what method or machine?  And who’d pay? Perhaps we should hire five thirty-eight.com to gather private polls. But we’d be mired in questions of polling methods and ethics.

Maybe we should have let the Confederacy go? Chucking Texas alone would make a big difference – although Texas is changing. Or maybe the coasts should secede. Those alternatives would leave us a smaller, weaker, country, subject to alliances with foreign powers against each other – the biggest fear and reason for action of the people who wrote and ratified our Constitution. Would such a split be like the former Czechoslovakia or the former Yugoslavia, which is to say a peaceful split or a bloodbath? Trump’s “base,” by the way, has been arming itself for that bloodbath for years.

Or maybe some of the 70% of us need to resettle with the 30% and change the country from the bottom up. But on that too, as we’d have said in Brooklyn, fat chance. I think that means that the more we care about the results, the more radical our views, the more we have to roll up our sleeves and work together that much harder on the elections, no matter which candidate becomes our standard bearer.

— This commentary was broadcast on WAMC Northeast Report, February 4, 2020.


Whitford v. Gill

June 19, 2018

Commentators have treated the Court’s decision in Whitford v. Gill, the Wisconsin gerrymandering case, as just a technical decision, a delay in getting a substantive decision out of the Court. They’re nuts and I’m furious.

Roberts, the current Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, is stalling for time. Time serves the Republicans in several ways: the most likely and immanent resignation is from Justice Kennedy who is the weak link in the conservative justices’ opposition to doing anything about gerrymandering; the oldest member of the Court is Justice Ginsburg and she is reliable in demanding equal protection in voting arrangements; replacing either of those justices while Trump is president would give Republicans a solid 5-vote majority in all elections cases and just about everything else. It would lock in the Republican majority. Roberts is trying as hard as he can to lock in Republican victories at all foreseeable elections, after famously telling the Senate at his confirmation hearings that he was merely an umpire calling balls and strikes. Umpires like that should be fired.

He also unleashed another ploy that people did not understand. By insisting that standing – a technical term for the right to sue – has to be asserted by plaintiffs based on their specific districts rather than statewide to challenge inequality in voting arrangements, he actually tried to shred plaintiffs’ proof. The best explanations of what gerrymandering is follow what the people who draw the lines actually do – they try for the best and most reliable statewide partisan vote for their party. But Roberts says that’s not justiciable. He wants proof for each district in which the voters votes are wasted and their voting power is diluted. But the basis of the dilution claim is precisely the equal protection comparison with all the other districts. If that is out of bounds, plaintiffs are entitled to take a walk to the outhouse.

But, a lawyer writing friendly-seeming language so that people will not understand how badly they are being affixed by a threaded metal fastener to the wall of defeat, Roberts makes it sound like they can just sharpen their presentation and then all will be just fine. Roberts should be impeached as unworthy of the robes of justice.

I’d go further. Many scholars have argued quite convincingly that over its two-and-a-quarter centuries, the U.S. Supreme Court has done much more harm than good. Some of us nearing the end of our careers happened to start practice at a time when we did have a people’s Court, a court that believed in equality and ended segregation, a court that believed in democracy and ended malapportionment, a court that believed in accurate fact-finding and tried to end abuses in the system of so-called criminal justice. But that Court has gradually slipped out of reach until the present Court has become an apologist for the abuses of the rich and the powerful, giving corporations the power to shred the rights of employees, customers, neighbors and political opponents.

So I think it’s time for some constitutional amendments that would really make a difference

  • End the electoral college in favor of voting for president by popular vote, ending the reign of minority presidents like Trump – unless the courts still manage to protect underworld control of elections
  • End the treatment of corporations as legal persons and let them face the regulatory ax
  • End gerrymandering and put an end to control by judicial partisans who shred the meaning of both equality and democracy
  • And, my favorite, an amendment to delete Article III and abolish the so-called Supreme Court – I’d like to see Roberts homeless, without a job, a robe or any of the respect due a decent person.

  This commentary was broadcast on WAMC Northeast Report, June 19, 2018.

 

 


May 23, 2017

Justice Kennedy has added some suspense regarding the future of gerrymandering, and therefore the future of Republican domination of state and federal legislatures. For my discussion on The Hill.com, click on Will the Supreme Court Draw the Line on Gerrymandering.


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