The Anti-Union Court

July 1, 2014

The Court decided yesterday in Harris v. Quinn that at least some of the employees who work under a collective bargaining agreement don’t have to share in the costs of negotiating that agreement. The Court says it violated their First Amendment rights. How many unions and employees it will apply to is still unclear but this is not the first move the Roberts Court has made in that direction.[i] Sometimes the patterns matter much more than the individual decisions, whether good or bad. Read the rest of this entry »


Passover – The Indivisibility of Freedom

April 15, 2014

This is Passover, a holiday that comes straight out of the Bible, the Almighty commanding us to tell the story of the Exodus to each new generation as well as reminding ourselves. The Exodus, of course, is a story of freedom from slavery. The Biblical story is about the Hebrew exodus from slavery in Egypt. But we are very explicit about relating that story to the freedom of others. Read the rest of this entry »


Supreme Court Recess Appointments Case

January 14, 2014

The Supreme Court heard argument yesterday about recess appointments. The Constitution says:

The President shall have the power to fill up all vacancies that may happen during the recess of the Senate, by granting commissions, which shall expire at the end of their next session.

Presidents have made such appointments since the Washington Administration. In the eighteenth century, adjournments were lengthy because travel to one’s state or district could take months. Now senators and representatives can make the trip quickly. Since at least Ronald Reagan, presidents have made appointments during intra-session adjournments of the Senate.

Democrats under Bush and Republicans under Obama started calling lengthy adjournments “pro forma sessions.” Nothing is supposed to happen; the Senate is vacant except for a couple of senators to gavel in these pro forma sessions. The purpose is straightforward – to prevent the president, initially Bush, now Obama, from making recess appointments so the government could keep functioning. Justices, on both sides of the political aisle, described that as “intransigence” and “irresponsibl[e].” Read the rest of this entry »


Supreme Poison: Adultery and States’ Rights

November 16, 2013

A week ago my students and I went to the U.S. Supreme Court and saw the argument in Bond v. United States.

Carol Bond tried to poison Myrlinda Haynes because of an affair with Bond’s husband. Local authorities wouldn’t bother helping Haynes but sent her to the Postal Service, because poison was found in her mail and the Postal Service has the power to prosecute crimes involving the mail. The Postal Service set up a camera and caught Bond in the act. Postal inspectors arrested Bond and a federal grand jury indicted her for violating the Chemical Weapons Implementation Act.

The United States is a party to the international Chemical Weapons Convention. Congress passed a statute to implement the Convention which prohibited “knowing possession or use, for nonpeaceful purposes, of a chemical that can cause death” or other harms. Treaties and state failure to execute them were a major reason for the Constitution, which gives Congress power to pass laws that are necessary and proper for carrying them out.

But attorneys for Bond smelled an opportunity to narrow national power, arguing such crimes were local and reserved to the states. Read the rest of this entry »


We Know They’re Spying on Us But How Are They Using the Information?

August 6, 2013

We have heard a great deal under both Bush and Obama about the extent of government surveillance, with a crescendo in recent weeks. We are learning that virtually all of us turn up in government surveillance in some way.

Dan Solove, in a series of wonderful books beginning with The Digital Person, has made clear that the problem is probably much worse than that, because the government employs a variety of private companies to massage its data. And still worse because we know that data is constantly bought and sold, mixed and matched, with results that are sometimes comic and sometimes tragic – people assigned identities by insufficiently skeptical computers that confuse our records with the records of criminals or v.i.p.’s. The databases can and do make mistakes that flag innocent people and deny them the right to vote, the ability to get a loan, a mortgage or just get on a plane.  Read the rest of this entry »


The New Jim Crow

July 16, 2013

While coming to record last week’s commentary, I was listening to Michelle Alexander on Alternative Radio. If you haven’t heard her or read her book, The New Jim Crow, I strongly recommend it. Some of us knew the basic facts but she fills in the details and makes the argument brilliantly.

I want to elaborate something implicit in her talk but not fully expressed – what she described is why civil liberties matter, one of the major reasons the ACLU was formed, and why Alexander was an attorney for the ACLU of Northern California. Read the rest of this entry »


Intransigence – the Auto-immune Disease of Democracy

July 9, 2013

Obviously I’ve been following the news from Egypt like everyone else. You don’t need commentators to tell you that ousting a democratically elected government is undemocratic and unacceptable. But I want to talk about Morsi’s mistakes because they illustrate a major misunderstanding of democracy.  Read the rest of this entry »


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